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Class Acts: SorcerersD&D Insider Article
The Shivs of Sorcery
By Claudio Pozas

The dagger has long stood as a symbol of the sorcerer’s magical power. Only the sorcerer knows how to instinctively focus his or her magical energy to the knife’s edge. A rare breed of sorcerers travels the length and breadth of the Nentir Vale and beyond, into the ruins of lost Arkhosia and dark Bael Turath, seeking to expand and improve their techniques. These travelers steer clear of libraries, temples, and other centers of academia. Instead they go to the seedier parts of towns and villages, to shadowed back alleys and damp cellars, where the true masters practice their bloody craft at knifepoint.

The sorcerers that follow the path of the shivs of sorcery are consummate strikers, as usual, but instead of focusing only on ranged attacks and bursts of elemental energy, they weave their spells to enhance their fighting prowess. The result is that the shivs of sorcery have more in common with rogues and barbarians than warlocks or archers. They tend to fight as skirmishers, mixing melee attacks and area spells liberally. They are among the first to volunteer for single combat, especially if the opposing champion wields weapons.

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    About the Author

    Claudio Pozas is a hybrid artist/writer multiclassed as a jack-of-all-trades. In the past 10 years, he worked on dozens of RPG products, usually doing both text and art. His credits include Fiery Dragon’s Counter Collection and BattleBox series. He lives in his native Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with his wife Paula, son Daniel, and their pet dire tiger Tyler. His art can be seen at www.enworld.org/Pozas.

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