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OFFICIAL NETRUNNER
STANDARD FLOOR RULES
Effective October 1, 1998

INTRODUCTION

The DCI Standard Floor Rules are the foundation of fair and consistent Netrunner tournament play worldwide. In order to maintain standardization, tournament participants must abide by both the rules themselves and the spirit in which they were created. Players who violate sections of the Standard Floor Rules or the codes of conduct will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide. The codes of conduct and the DCI penalty guide are included in the Appendix.

A. NECESSARY TOURNAMENT MATERIALS
Players must bring the following items to a tournament in order to participate:

  • Visible method to count bit totals (counters, dice, pen and pencil, and so on).
  • Visible items that denote accumulating card effects (dice, beads, and so on).
    Note: Other Netrunner cards may not serve as counters, except those specifically designed to serve this purpose. The head judge may disallow any counter at his or her discretion.
  • One DCI membership card.
    New players may register for DCI membership at their first tournament. Players may only have one membership card and one DCI number. Players using more than one DCI membership number should be reported to the DCI.
  • Any materials specifically required for a particular tournament format.
    Example: Players need to bring preassembled decks to Constructed tournaments.
  • Additional required materials-if any-are determined by the related rules sections or by the tournament organizer. Tournament organizers specifying additional required materials for their tournaments must announce this requirement sufficiently in advance of the tournament.

B. TOURNAMENT SANCTIONING & RATING TYPES
The DCI sanctions the following Netrunner tournament types:

  • Constructed Netrunner
  • Limited Netrunner
The DCI produces the following ratings and rankings categories:
  • Constructed Netrunner
  • Limited Netrunner

C. PREGAME PROTOCOL
The following steps must be performed in order before each round begins.

  1. Players shuffle their decks. See Section 1.3.11.
  2. Players present their decks to their opponents (for additional shuffling and cutting, if desired).
  3. Each player draws five cards from his or her deck and collects 5 bits from the bit bank.

STANDARD FLOOR RULES

IMPORTANT NOTE REGARDING ALL OPTIONAL RULES: Tournament organizers, tournament officials, and head judges who choose to use any rule marked "OPTIONAL" must provide notice to participants before the tournament begins. Optional rules may not be invoked or altered by either tournament officials or players once the tournament begins.

1.0 RULES GOVERNING ALL SANCTIONED TOURNAMENT PLAY

1.0.1 Judges, tournament organizers, and tournament officials may not play in the events they organize or run.

1.0.2 Rules Knowledge Responsibilities
Competitors in sanctioned tournaments are responsible for knowing and following the most current version of the DCI Standard Floor Rules and any other applicable regulatory documents.

1.0.3 Tournament Coordinator Handbook
Tournament organizers must have their updated DCI Tournament Coordinator Handbooks and a current copy of the DCI Standard Floor Rules available at any DCI-sanctioned events they are running. Tournament organizers must have copies of the most recent rulings, errata, and clarifications from the Top Runners' Conference.

1.1 Head Judge
Officially sanctioned competition requires the presence of a head judge during play to interpret rules, terminate excessively long matches, disqualify players, and make other official decisions. The head judge may enlist the help of other officials to answer rules questions or perform other tasks at the head judge's request. The head judge and the tournament organizer can, but do not have to, be the same individual.

1.1.1 Appeals to the Head Judge
If players should disagree with a tournament official's decision, they are free to appeal the ruling to the head judge. The head judge has the right to overrule all tournament officials' decisions.

1.2 RULES INFRACTIONS & JUDICIAL RESPONSIBILITIES
Judges must take action to resolve any rules infraction (whether a violation of the Standard Floor Rules or the rules for Netrunner) they notice or that is brought to their attention. Competitors are not permitted to waive penalties on behalf of their opponents. The head judge must ensure that the appropriate penalty, if any, is imposed.

1.3 RULES MOST LIKELY TO REQUIRE ENFORCEMENT OR INTERPRETATION

1.3.1 Termination of Lengthy Matches
The head judge may be required to determine the outcome of an excessively long match prior to its actual conclusion. Before intervening to terminate a match, the head judge must give the players involved at least thirty minutes prior notice.

Once the notice period passes, the judge announces that the match is over. A player in mid-turn has five minutes to complete his or her turn before the match result is determined. (A player in mid-turn is someone who has resolved start-of-turn effects.)

1.3.2 Tempo of Play
Players must take their turns in a timely fashion. Whereas taking a reasonable amount of time to think through game strategy is acceptable, deliberately stalling for time is not. If the head judge determines that a player purposely failed to complete his or her turn in a reasonable amount of time, that player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

1.3.3 Pregame Time Limit
Prior to each game, competitors have five minutes to thoroughly shuffle their own decks. This five-minute period does not include shuffling an opponent's deck. Shuffling requirements specified in Section 1.3.11 apply during these steps.

If the head judge determines that a player exceeded the time limit on purpose and is stalling, the head judge will subject the player to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

OPTIONAL: The head judge or tournament organizer may set a time limit of less than five minutes for these procedures, but if he or she does so, this policy must be announced to players before the tournament begins.

1.3.4 Mid-game Shuffling Time Limit
A one-minute time limit exists for all shuffling that occurs during a game. If the head judge determines that a player's shuffling time is excessive, that player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

Shuffling requirements specified in Section 1.3.11 apply.

1.3.5 Tardiness
Players are expected to be in their seats when each round begins. Players arriving at their seats ten minutes after the round begins receive a first-game loss in the match and a match loss after an additional ten minutes. Players who fail to take their seats by the end of the first round will be ejected from the tournament.

1.3.6 Cheating
Cheating will not be tolerated. The head judge reviews all cheating allegations, and if he or she determines that a player cheated, the head judge will issue the appropriate penalty based on the DCI penalty guide. All tournament disqualifications are subject to DCI review, and further penalties may be assessed.

  • Cheating includes, but is not limited to:
  • Receiving outside assistance or coaching
  • Looking at opponents' cards while shuffling or cutting
  • Taking notes-See Section 1.3.6.1
  • Misrepresenting cards or rules
  • Underpaying bit costs
  • Using marked cards/sleeves-See Section 1.3.6.2
  • Intentionally marking cards/sleeves during play
  • Drawing extra cards
  • Manipulating which cards are drawn from the player's or the opponent's deck
  • Deliberately stalling the length of a turn to take advantage of a time limit
  • Intentionally misrepresenting public information (bit totals, number of cards in hand, and so on).

1.3.6.1 Taking Notes
Players are not allowed to take notes on the contents of an opponent's deck while participating in a match, other than the following:

  • total MU for the Runner;
  • maximum hand size;
  • virus counters and similar effects;
  • bit totals;
  • the total number of cards each participant has played; and/or
  • agenda point totals for each player.
    (Next to each entry, players may write a brief description of what caused any change.)

If any other notes are taken, the player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guide.

1.3.6.2 Marked Cards
A card is considered marked if it bears anything that makes it possible to identify the card without seeing its face. If each card is sleeved, the sleeve is considered part of the card.

For cards in clear sleeves, both the sleeve and the card must be examined in order to determine whether a card is marked.

For cards in opaque-backed sleeves, the sleeve must be examined in order to determine whether a card is marked.

For more information about the use of card sleeves, see Section 1.3.10.

If the head judge determines that a card in a player's deck is marked, that player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

1.3.7 Unsportsmanlike Conduct
Unsportsmanlike conduct is unacceptable and will not tolerated at any time. Judges, players, and officials must behave in a polite, respectable, and sportsmanlike manner. Collusion to alter the results of a game or match is considered to be unsportsmanlike and will not be tolerated. Players who engage in collusion, use profanity, argue, act belligerently toward tournament officials or one another, or harass spectators, tournament officials, or opponents, will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide and will be subject to further DCI review.

1.3.8 Card Elevation
Players must keep their cards on or above the level of the playing surface. If players need to temporarily set aside their hand of cards, the cards must be laid visibly on the table.

Example: The "trace game" and similar effects require players to select a number of bits, either by holding them in their hands or noting the amount in some manner. The player may opt to set the hand of cards down in plain view on the table to facilitate this action.

1.3.9 Proxy Cards
The use of proxy cards is not permitted, unless these cards are provided by a judge. When a judge determines that a card has become excessively worn through play or accidentally damaged in the current sanctioned tournament, the judge may provide a proxy replacement card at his or her discretion.

The term "proxy" includes counterfeit cards or any card that is not a genuine Netrunner card. Violation of this rule will be considered unsportsmanlike conduct and the responsible player will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide and to further DCI review. Counterfeiters will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

All cards in the participant's deck MUST be genuine Netrunner cards.

1.3.10 Card Sleeves
A player may use plastic card sleeves or other protective devices on cards. If a player chooses to use card sleeves, all cards in the player's current deck must be placed in these devices in an identical manner. If the sleeves feature holograms or other similar markings, cards must be inserted into the sleeves so that these markings appear only on the face of the cards. If for any reason any player's opponent wishes a player to remove the sleeves or protective devices, he or she may request this prior to the beginning of any match, and the player must immediately comply. All player requests to desleeve must be made prior to the beginning of the match.

Once a match has begun, a player may request that the judge inspect his or her opponent's card sleeves. The judge may disallow a player's card sleeves if the judge believes they are marked, worn, or otherwise in a condition that interferes with shuffling or game play. A card sleeve may be used to mark a player's card if the card is in the opponent's playing field.

Newly released card sleeves and/or types of protective devices are not permitted in sanctioned tournaments until the DCI gives its official approval for their use.

OPTIONAL: The head judge or tournament organizer may declare that card sleeves may not be used. If this option is used, it must be announced before the tournament begins.

1.3.11 Shuffle
Regardless of the method used to shuffle the deck, players' decks must be sufficiently randomized. After decks are presented, if a player is not satisfied that his or her opponent's deck is sufficiently randomized, the player must notify the head judge. The head judge has final authority regarding whether or not a deck has been sufficiently randomized.

Each time a player shuffles his or her deck during a match, the player's opponent may shuffle and/or cut the player's deck. Players may not use this rule as an opportunity to view any cards in an opponent's deck. After shuffling, the cards are returned to their original owners, who may cut (but not reshuffle) the cards before play begins.

1.3.12 Forgetting about Paying Card Costs
If a player ends an action and does not pay the appropriate cost, the effects of not paying that cost are realized immediately and the player is subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

Example: If the Runner plays Lucidrine Booster Drug to make a run and fails to account for the required brain damage, that damage is assessed immediately when the violation is noted.

1.3.13 Electronic Devices
OPTIONAL: The head judge or tournament organizer may choose not to allow players to participate with electronic devices such as cellular phones, pagers, 'trodes, and/or portable audio units turned on. Players violating this rule will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

1.3.14 Spectators
Players have the right to request that any person, other than tournament officials, not observe their match. All such requests must be made through the head judge.

Spectators are expected to remain silent during the course of the match and are not permitted to communicate with players in any way while a match is in progress. Players are not permitted to observe other games.

1.3.13 Lengthy Rulings
If a judge needs more than one minute to make a ruling, either player may request that their match be extended by the amount of time that the game was delayed. The head judge may then, at his or her discretion, extend the match by the appropriate amount of time.

1.4 POSTING TOURNAMENT-SPECIFIC DCI STANDARD FLOOR RULES AT TITLE EVENTS
Tournament organizers coordinating title events (championships, et al.) must post tournament-specific sections of the DCI Standard Floor Rules at the tournament.

2.0 RULES FOR NETRUNNER CONSTRUCTED TOURNAMENTS

2.1 Constructed Tournament Required Materials
In order to participate in a sanctioned Constructed tournament, players must bring a preassembled deck of Netrunner cards (and everything specified in the introduction, Section A). Players' decks must each contain at least forty-five (45) cards. Corp decks must contain the minimum number of agenda points required by the Netrunner game rules. Players must each use the same deck throughout the tournament.

2.1.1 Tournament-Legal Decks
Decks that contain fewer than forty-five (45) cards, or Corp decks that contain less than the required agenda point total, do not comply with Section 2.1 and are not tournament legal. Use of illegal decks will result in the responsible player being subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

The following card sets are permitted in sanctioned Constructed Netrunner tournaments as of October 1, 1998:

  • Netrunner
  • Proteus

2.1.2 Deck Registration
OPTIONAL: The head judge or tournament organizer may require players to register their decks upon arrival at a tournament. Registration records the original composition of each deck. Once a player's decklist is received by a tournament official, it may only be altered at the head judge's discretion. The deck must be returned to its original composition before the beginning of a new match.

NOTE: Wizards of the Coast, Inc., reserves the right to publish contents of decks as well as transcripts or video reproductions of any sanctioned tournament.

2.1.3 New Releases
New Netrunner card sets (i.e., new expansions or new editions of the basic set) released during the first 15 days of a month are allowed in tournament play on the first day of the month following their retail release dates. Card sets released after the first 15 days of a month are allowed in tournament play on the first day of the second month following their release dates. Therefore, card sets always enter tournament play two to five weeks after their retail release dates, and always on the first day of the month. The DCI announces the exact date that each new card set enters tournament play before the set is released.

The card sets a tournament organizer plans to use at a tournament must be announced by tournament officials or the tournament organizer prior to the event.

2.1.4 Banned and Restricted Cards
There are no banned or restricted cards for Constructed Netrunner tournaments.

NOTE: The Banned and Restricted Lists are modified quarterly by the DCI as follows: March 1, June 1, September 1, and December 1.

2.2 ANTE
Players may not wager ante.

3.0 RULES FOR NETRUNNER LIMITED TOURNAMENTS

3.1 GENERAL RULES FOR LIMITED TOURNAMENTS

3.1.1 Banned and Restricted Lists
No Banned or Restricted lists exist for Limited-environment tournaments.

3.1.2 Anomalous Decks, Boosters, and Cards
If a player receives an anomalous deck, booster pack, or card, it should be brought to the head judge's attention and replaced at his or her discretion. In the case of an anomalous-or "marked"-card, the judge may replace it with a proxy card at his or her discretion. Neither Wizards of the Coast, Inc., nor the tournament organizer guarantees any specific distribution of card rarities or frequency in a particular pack or deck.

3.1.3 Deck Size Requirements
Each deck is required to have a minimum of forty-five (45) cards. Corp decks must contain the minimum number of agenda points required by the Netrunner game rules. Before a game begins, each player is allowed to count the number of cards in his or her opponent's deck to ensure the total number of cards has not changed since the deck was originally issued. Any discrepancy should be reported to a tournament official and, pending an investigation, the head judge will subject the player to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

3.1.4 Deck Registration
OPTIONAL: The head judge or tournament organizer may require players to record on a decklist every card they receive in a Limited tournament. Once the cards are registered, players have a limited amount of time to prepare their decks before play begins. The time allotted for deck construction must be announced by the head judge before the tournament begins.

3.1.5 Card Use
Players must only use the actual cards they receive or draft at a Limited tournament. Players may not trade or replace cards they receive or draft at a Limited tournament with any other cards, even if the replacement is an exact copy. If a card is damaged or otherwise considered "marked," players must comply with Section 3.1.2-Anomalous Decks, Boosters and Cards.

3.1.6 Early Departure
Limited-tournament participants may not withdraw from the event prior to the first match. Violation of this rule shall result in the offending participant receiving a match loss on the official tournament record (the opponent shall receive a match win).

3.2 RULES FOR SEALED-DECK TOURNAMENTS

3.2.1 Deck Construction
Before tournament play begins, each player receives a sealed deck of Netrunner cards and various booster packs, from which he or she will create a tournament deck.

The total number of cards available to a player for deck construction is determined by tournament officials prior to the event. The DCI suggests giving each player a combination of decks and/or boosters totaling ninety (90) to one hundred and eighty (180) cards.

4.0 TOURNAMENT SCORING

4.1 Scoring Point Types
There are two different types of scoring points in Netrunner tournaments.

Game Points are awarded for winning games.

Tournament Points are awarded based on the number of games and matches won.

4.2 Game Point Scoring

A player receives ten (10) Game Points for winning a game. The losing player receives a number of Game Points equal to the agenda points scored.

In the event of an incomplete game, each player scores Game Points equal to the number of agenda points scored.

4.3 Tournament Point Scoring

A player receives one (1) Tournament Point for each game he or she has won in a match. The winner of the match receives one (1) additional Tournament Point.

A player who wins both games of the match is the winner of the match. If one game is incomplete when the match ends, the winner of the match is the winner of the complete game. Where each player has won one game, or no game was completed during the match, the player with the higher Game Point total is the winner of the match.

The tournament winner is the player with the highest Tournament Point total at the end of the final round.

APPENDIX I. DEFINITION OF TERMS

Cut: Removing a single portion of a deck and placing it atop the remaining portion without looking at any of the card faces.

Deck: Selection of cards that conforms to the deck construction rules for that particular format. For format-specific information, see:

  • Section 2.3 for Constructed tournaments
  • Section 3.1 for Limited tournaments

Game: One complete game of Netrunner

Match: A series of two games between two players to determine the winner. Each player in the match plays one game as the Runner and one game as the Corp.

Proxy card: A card used during competition to represent another card; also counterfeit cards, or any card that is not a genuine Netrunner card.

Public information: Statistics or card text that game participants are required to share with tournament officials and opponents by the rules of the game.

Round: The period during which match play takes place.

Stalling: Intentionally playing slowly in order to gain an advantage in a game or match.

APPENDIX II. CODES OF CONDUCT

i. Introduction
The purpose of the Codes of Conduct is to provide players and officials with a guide to expected behavior during Wizards of the Coast sanctioned tournaments. By entering a Netrunner tournament, players and spectators agree to abide by all rulings rendered by tournament officials.

ii. Sportsmanlike Conduct
Sportsmanlike conduct is based on mutual respect. Players, spectators, volunteers, and tournament officials are expected to exhibit this respect throughout a tournament.

iii. Unsportsmanlike Conduct
Unsportsmanlike conduct is not tolerated at any officially sanctioned tournament. Players, judges, spectators, and volunteers must conduct themselves in a polite, respectable, and sportsmanlike manner. A competitor behaving in a belligerent, argumentative, hostile, or unsportsmanlike manner will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide (see Appendix III).

The following behavior is automatically considered unsportsmanlike conduct:

  • profanity
  • physical intimidation
  • failing to start a game or match in a timely manner
  • arguing excessively with a judge
  • scouting other competitors' decks
  • enlisting the aid of observers to scout other competitors' decks
  • disobeying/disregarding the rules for the tournament event
  • willfully disobeying a ruling by the head judge or DCI tournament manager

iv. Reporting Violations of the Codes of Conduct
It is a player's individual responsibility to promptly notify tournament officials of any condition he or she believes interferes with tournament play. By failing to immediately notify tournament officials of possible unsportsmanlike conduct, witnesses and others waive any possible claims against tournament officials and/or the tournament organization(s) for not taking action. Notifying tournament officials means the possible conduct violation may be investigated at the officials' discretion. Any possible penalties will be issued based solely on the outcome of the officials' investigation.

If a player disagrees with how tournament officials handled the possible conduct violation, he or she can appeal the ruling to the DCI staff or the DCI tournament manager (if at the tournament) for a final decision. When the DCI staff (or DCI tournament manager) issues a final ruling, the players must follow that decision without further argument or other difficulties. If a player continues to argue or be disruptive, he or she will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

v. Player Responsibilities
All players must obey the current official tournament rules applicable to the tournament type in which they are competing. If a player has a rules question, he or she should communicate it to the other player and judging staff in a concise, polite, and rational manner.

Players have the right to appeal a judge's decision to the head judge. Players may appeal the head judge's decision to the DCI tournament manager (if at the tournament). When the head judge (or DCI tournament manager) issues a final ruling, the players must follow that decision without further argument or other difficulties. If a player continues to argue or be disruptive, he or she will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI penalty guide.

vi. Spectator Responsibilities
To ensure that spectators at official tournament events do not disturb the players' ability to concentrate on their matches, spectators must maintain a minimum distance of three feet from the players and the play table. Spectators must also remain silent and refrain from engaging in any behavior that could be disruptive to the players. A spectator may not take notes regarding any player's deck during a tournament, unless he or she is doing so for journalistic purposes and has received advance clearance from the head judge or DCI tournament manager. Any spectator violating these rules may be warned by tournament officials or may be required to leave the event.

vii. Volunteer Responsibilities
Volunteers should receive a full briefing by the judging staff in preparation for the tournament event, including:

  • an overview of the official tournament rules, format, and procedures
  • a review of the rules governing scoring
  • a discussion regarding the length and number of tournament rounds
  • policies regarding player movement during the tournament

As with any public representative of DCI tournaments, volunteers are expected to treat players, spectators, and others with respect. Should any player or spectator feel that a judge has not treated him or her with respect, he or she may file a complaint with the DCI players' organization.

viii Tournament Organizer
The tournament organizer is charged with making sure an event runs smoothly and properly, and returning the event's results to the DCI in a complete and timely manner. Unless the organizer is also the head judge, he or she is not authorized to overrule any rules-related decisions made by the head judge.

ix. Judge Responsibilities
Judges must be provided with accurate and precise plans and procedures from the head judge and/or DCI tournament manager (if at the tournament).

Judges must treat players and spectators in a courteous and polite manner. Should any player or spectator feel that a judge has not treated him or her with respect, he or she may file a complaint with the DCI, head judge, and/or the DCI tournament manager (if at the tournament).

x. Head Judge Responsibilities
If the DCI tournament manager is not in attendance, the head judge is the final arbiter of all questions and disputes during a tournament. As with all other public representatives of DCI tournaments, head judges are expected to treat players and others in a courteous and polite manner. Should any player or spectator feel that a judge has not treated him or her with respect, he or she may file a complaint with the DCI and/or the DCI tournament manager (if at the tournament).

xi. DCI Tournament Manager
The DCI tournament manager is an employee of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., and is the final judicial authority at all events that he or she attends. The tournament manager may reverse any decision made by the head judge or any other tournament official. If the DCI tournament manager is present at the tournament, that person decides the degree to which a player should be subject to the DCI penalty guide.



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Wizards is headquartered in Renton, Washington, PO Box 707, Renton, WA 98057.

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