Magic Weekend Paris Travel Information

Arriving in Paris

Paris, like many large capital cities, has wonderful public transportation. Plus, the city itself is not very big. Pick up a copy of the Metro/RER and Bus maps (plans). You can easily get the hang of public transportation and cheaply sail through town.

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Metro tickets can be bought in packets, called a carnet (pronounced Car-Nay). Paris Métro single tickets cost €1.60 each. You can save money by purchasing a carnet of 10 tickets for €11.60 at the ticket window of any Métro station or from vending machines near the turnstiles. Ask for "un billet, s'il vous plait" or "un carnet, s'il vous plait." (A carnet is simply a stack of individual tickets that you can share with family or friends.)

A single ticket will take you anywhere within the city of Paris on the Métro and RER networks, and you can transfer between lines--or between the Métro and the RER--on the same ticket.

You can also use tickets from your carnet on public buses, and transfers from one transportation mode to another (i.e., from rail to bus or tram) are now permitted. Your ticket is valid for 1½ hours from the time it's stamped.

Note: Tickets purchased from bus drivers don't allow transfers, so buy a carnet or a few tickets ahead of time in the Métro if you plan to ride the bus and transfer to the underground.

 

Arriving by Air

From Paris-Orly airport to the venue
1. Get the shuttle bus «Paris par le train» from Paris-Orly to the RER C station «Pont de Rungis Aéroport d’Orly».

  • If you arrive from Paris-Orly South, the shuttle bus stops at entrance F
  • If you arrive from Paris-Orly West, the shuttle bus stops at entrance G Arrival level.

2. From the station «Pont de Rungis Aéroport d’Orly», take the RER C heading for « Pontoise» to the station «Pereire Levallois».

3. From «Pereire Levallois», take the line number 3 in the subway, heading for «Pont de Levallois Bécon» to the station «Porte de Champerret».

4. Follow the map and walk from the station «Porte de Champerret» to the Espace Champerret.

From Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport to the venue
The station «Aéroport Charles de Gaulle 1» serves terminals 1 and 3. The station «Aéroport Charles de Gaulle 2 - TGV» serves terminals 2 ABCDEF and G. Terminal 2G is linked to terminal 2C

1. Take the RER B heading «Robinson Saint-Rémy-lès-Chevreuse» to the station «Gare du Nord».

2. From «Gare du Nord», take the line number 4 in the subway, heading for «Porte d’Orléans» to the station «Réaumur-Sébastopol».

3. From «Réaumur-Sébastopol», take the line number 3 in the subway, heading for «Pont de Levallois Bécon» to the station «Porte de Champerret».

5. Follow the map and walk from the station « Porte de Champerret » to the Espace Champerret.


Taxi
Taxis can be a quick—if somewhat expensive—way to go. We do not recommend this method at rush hour, since fares can mount quickly while stuck in traffic!

The rates, which are regulated by the Paris Prefect of Police, vary according to the time of day and the zone of travel (urban, suburban, and beyond). In addition to the metered amount, there is a supplement of about €1 for each piece of luggage, as well as €2.70 for a fourth passenger. Taxi stands outside each terminal are well-indicated. It is your responsibility to have the correct amount of money (in €uros) for the fare. The use of credit cards in Parisian taxis is rare, and personal checks are usually not accepted. It is also customary to tip the driver about 10% of the fare, if service was good and the cab was clean.

Private Hire and Shared Shuttles
An affordable alternative to the high cost of taxis and other private transportation, various airport shuttle companies offer 7- and 8-passenger minivans with comfortable seating and ample cargo space. Courteous, English-speaking drivers will assist you with your luggage, then drive you safely from any CDG terminal directly to your hotel. The minivan shuttles provide "door-to-door" service, combining convenience and the shortest travel time. Ideal for small groups, these shuttles plan their passenger loads so that no more than 3 stops are made on any one trip into the city (private shuttles are also available).

Advance reservations are required. You will be asked to provide your arrival time, flight number, and airline; the operator monitors your flight's arrival status by Internet, assuring that a driver will be there to greet you — even if your flight is delayed. Here are some websites:


 

Arriving by Train

You will need to buy tickets for the RE/Metro. See above.

Gare du Nord
Most trains from the north (London, Berlin, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, etc.) will arrive at the Gare du Nord. The TGV platforms are above ground, so make your way down to the RER/Metro platforms. Follow the signs to the Metro line 4. Take this train in the direction of Porte d'Orleans. Exit the train at the Réaumur Sébastopol station. Change trains here to the 3 line, direction Pont de Levallois-Bécon. Exit the train at the Louise Michel station. Once above ground, walk south on Avenue Anatole France to the roundabout. Continue south, and after the tall building on your right you will come upon the grounds of the venue. You should continue south to the next intersection and turn right for the main entrance.

Gare de Lyon
Most trains from the south (Milan, Barcelona, Marseille) will arrive at the Gare de Lyon. The TGV platforms are above ground, so make your way down to the RER/Metro platforms. Follow the signs for the RER-A. Take it in the direction of Cergy/Poissy/St-Germain-en-Laye. You will exit the train at the Auber station. You will have to walk through the station, following the signs for the Metro line 3. Using the same ticket, take the Metro line 3 in the direction of Pont de Levallois-Bécon. Exit the train at the Louise Michel station. Once above ground, walk south on Avenue Anatole France to the roundabout. Continue south, and after the tall building on your right you will come upon the grounds of the venue. You should continue south to the next intersection and turn right for the main entrance.

Gare de l'Est
From here, take the Metro line 7 in the direction of Villejuif-Louis Aragon. Exit this train at the Opéra station. Follow the signs to the Metro line 3. Take this in the direction of Pont de Levallois-Bécon. Exit the train at the Louise Michel station. Once above ground, walk south on Avenue Anatole France to the roundabout. Continue south, and after the tall building on your right you will come upon the grounds of the venue. You should continue south to the next intersection and turn right for the main entrance.

Gare de Montarnasse
From here, take the Metro line 12 towards Porte de la Chapelle. Exit the train at Saint Lazare.

Gare Saint Lazare
Follow the signs to the Metro 3 line. Take the Metro line 3 in the direction of Pont de Levallois-Bécon. Exit the train at the Louise Michel station. Once above ground, walk south on Avenue Anatole France to the roundabout. Continue south, and after the tall building on your right you will come upon the grounds of the venue. You should continue south to the next intersection and turn right for the main entrance.

Gare d'Austerlitz
Take the Metro line 5 north towards Bobigny-Pablo Picasso. Exit the train at the République station. Follow the signs to Metro line 3. Take the Metro line 3 in the direction of Pont de Levallois-Bécon. Exit the train at the Louise Michel station. Once above ground, walk south on Avenue Anatole France to the roundabout. Continue south, and after the tall building on your right you will come upon the grounds of the venue. You should continue south to the next intersection and turn right for the main entrance.


 

Arriving by Bus

Buses arrive at the Gallieni bus station. From there, get Metro line 3 north towards Pont de Levallois-Bécon. Exit the train at the Louise Michel station. Once above ground, walk south on Avenue Anatole France to the roundabout. Continue south, and after the tall building on your right you will come upon the grounds of the venue. You should continue south to the next intersection and turn right for the main entrance.


 

Arriving by Car

Driving in Paris can be a tricky experience. Not only are the streets complicated, but the drivers are impatient and fast, and parking is scarce and expensive. We would highly recommend finding a hotel with secure parking and leaving your car there for the duration of your stay.
There are many different roads and routes into Paris. Visit www.mappy.com, select your language, and find your itinerary. This will give you door to door directions, including price and time estimates for tolls and gas.


 

Hotel Information

Here are several hotels close to the event site. These hotels not endorsed by or affiliated with Wizards of the Coast.

Hôtel Espace Champerret
26 Rue Louise Michel, 92300 Levallois-Perret
Phone : +331 47 57 20 71 ‎

Le Magellan
17 Rue Jean-Baptiste Dumas, 75017 Paris
Phone : +331 45 72 44 51

Hotel Champerret-Elysees
129 Avenue de Villiers, 75017 Paris
Phone : +331 47 64 44 00

Hotel Champerret Heliopolis Paris
13 Rue d'Héliopolis, 75017 Paris
Phone : +331 47 64 92 56

Booking.com is also a good place to look for hotels near the venue. You can check your criteria (distance, parking, amenities, price, number of stars, etc.) and book online. In “destination,” type “Levallois Perret” for hotels closest to the Espace Champerret.


 

Amenities Near the Venue

Paris is divided into districts called "arrondissements." The venue is in the 17th arrondissment. These districts are not laid out in a linear fashion, but rather in a spiral, beginning in the middle of the city and spiraling clockwise outwards.

There is something to see in every part of the city, and the Metro snakes around underneath it all. For longer trips, take the Metro, as the buses will wind and you'll end up spending multiple tickets on bus transfers to get from point A to point B. But if you just want to go for a short trip from one part of one arrondissement to another, buses can be nice by allowing you to see the city and situated yourself in it.

Restaurants
There is no shortage of places to eat around the venue. The Espace Champerret is situated in the borough of Levallois Perret. One block north of the venue is the Rue Louise Michel. All along this street, on both sides, you will find all sorts of restaurants, from Italian to Japanese to salads and sandwiches. Here's a breakdown of some places to eat:

Restaurant Fare Set Menu A la Carte Sit In? Take Away? Time Comments
Bella Myrna Mediterranean 15-30€ 20-40€ X   1 hour  
Home Café Sandwiches, soups, salads Starts at €7.90 Starts at €5.90   X 10 min  
Yamada Japanese Under 10€ 10-20€ X X Under 30 min Can deliver close-by
Le Fontenoy Bistro 10-15€ 10-20€ X   Under 1 hour  
Sumitta Asian Under 10€ 5-10€ X X Under 30 min. Asian generally indicates Vietnamese
Casa Luigi Italian Under 10€ 5-10€ X X 10 min  
Le Palais de Shanghai Asian Under 10€ 10-20€ X X Under 30 min  
L’Espace Carnot Brasserie 10-15€ 10-20€ X   Under 30 min Also on Rue Carnot
Hollywood Canteen Fast Food Under 10€ 10-20€   X 5 min  
Shogun Sushi Sushi/Japanese 10-15€ 10-20€ X   Under 30 min  

My Kitchen By Me is a kosher deli one half-block south of Rue Louise Michel on Rue Carnot that is well reviewed. Also, McDonald's is not far. Walk east on Rue Louise Michel to the very end. Turn north (left) on Rue de Président Wilson, and a little ways up on your right, you'll see the golden arches.

There are several little markets (Proxi, Franprix, and a kosher market) on the Rue Louise Michel where you can stock up on groceries. Also, most boulangeries (bakeries) will do a sandwich and drink special at lunch time.


 

Sightseeing in Paris

A very pleasant way to spend the day, if you have all day, is on a hop-on/hop-off bus tour. This takes you above ground to all the major sights, allowing you to situate yourself in the city and only hop-off the bus when it suits you. Commentaries are in several languages, and with your ticket, you can sometimes get discounted entries to famous attractions. Plus, at this time of year, you often get a two-day ticket for the price of one (for consecutive days).

There are also the "bateaux-mouches" tours from the River Seine. These glass-topped boats shuttle people up and down the river all day and most evenings, showing tourists Paris from a different angle. Commentaries are in several languages, but keep the weather in mind. If it is raining, the glass tops of the boats can be difficult to see through, and the outside decks can be freezing.

The Louvre
To learn the Louvre in and out, you might need a lifetime. Still, one has to start somewhere. The site of the world's largest and most diverse collection of pre-20th century painting, sculpture, and decorative objects, The Louvre is definitely one of Paris' best attractions. The palace itself is testament to a rich history spanning from the medieval period to the present. The adjacent Tuileries gardens are perfect for a stroll pre-or post-visit. The nearest Metro station is Palais Royal-Musée du Louvre accessible by the 1 line.

Notre Dame Cathedral

No first trip to Paris is complete without a visit to this marvel of gothic architecture. One of the most singular and beautiful cathedrals of Europe, Notre Dame Cathedral's dramatic towers, spire, stained glass and statuary are guaranteed to take your breath away. Witness firsthand the spot that was once the heartbeat of medieval Paris, and that took over 100 years of hard labor to complete. Climbing the North tower to see Paris from the hunchback Quasimodo's vantage is essential, too. The nearest Metro station is Saint Michel, accessible by the 4 line or the RER B or C.

Eiffel Tower
More than any other landmark, the Eiffel Tower has come to represent an elegant and contemporary Paris. It was built for the 1889 World Exposition by Gustave Eiffel, and was nearly torn down, it was so wildly unpopular with locals at its unveiling. It has since attracted over 220 million visitors, and it would be hard to imagine Paris now without it. The closest Metro station is Bir-Hakeim on the 6 line or Trocadero on the 9 line.

Here are a few little-known activities that should not be missed.

The Catacombs
The Catacombs of Paris are made of the bones of approximately 6 million Parisians. From the end of the 18th century to the middle of the 19th, many of Paris' cemeteries closed due to disease, and the remains of the interred were taken to these limestone quarries by priests and laid to final rest (in truly macabre design). The catacombs are open every day from 10am to 5pm, except Mondays. The closest Metro station is Denfert-Rochereau.

The Sewers
Sounds strange, but this is something no one should miss. To quote one visitor:

    "Our decision to visit les égouts seemed counterintuitive, a bit perverse. Who comes to the City of Light to go underground? We did, and so should you. Anyone who has taken the elevator to the top of the Eiffel Tower, or taken in Quasimodo's bell tower view from atop Notre-Dame, might enjoy seeing this European capital from a different vantage. Every Parisian street lies atop its own corresponding sewer, complete with its own underground street sign. It is a city within a city, a dank, fascinating demimonde from which one emerges blinking and thinking, 'Now that was cool.'"
The closest Metro to the entrance is Alma-Marceau.

Père LaChaise Cemetery
The number of people buried here boggles the mind. This cemetery is as large as a small city and you can see the graves of some incredibly famous (and infamous) people. From Jim Morrison to Edith Piaf, from Chopin and Bizet and Balzac, to the human cannonball, there is certainly someone here you would like to visit. Generals, writers, musicians, philosophers and dead aristocrats abound. The graves are beautiful. This is a great day out if you like history (and/or cemeteries). Maps are for sale at the entrance for a couple of €uros, but entrance itself is free. Take a map. It really is big. The nearest Metro station is Père LaChaise, on the 2 and 3 lines.

Going Out

The closest nightlife to the venue will be in the 18th and 9th arrondissements. Here you get the artistic district of Montmartre (18th), and the cabaret shows of Pigalle (9th). Take the Metro line 3 south to Villiers, and change to the Metro line 2. Take this towards Nation. You can exit the train at Pigalle for the famous Moulin Rouge and its surrounding area or continue on to the Anvers station and take the Funiculaire de Montmartre and enjoy the famous views of the Sacré Coeur and surrounding areas.

The 18th is a very lively, culturally diverse, and artistically active community. If you're looking for something a little trendier, you'll want to head to somewhere like Oberkampf , Bastille, or Marais.

Oberkampf is in the 11th arrondissement. Take the Metro line 3 towards Gambetta and exit at the République station. You can switch to the Metro line 5 and take it one stop (towards Place d'Italie) to the Oberkampf station, or exit the Metro system at République and stroll down the Boulevard Voltaire to Oberkampf.

Bastille is also in the 11th. It is very lively, often crowded, and a good place for dancing and those looking for a party atmosphere. Take the Metro line 3 to République and change here for the Metro line 5 towards Place d'Italie. Exit the train at Bastille.

Marais is close by in the 4th arrondissement. The Marais is one of the oldest and most beautiful Paris neighborhoods. It gives more than a glimpse of what the city was like before the architect Haussmann remodeled most of Paris in the mid-19th century. In the same right, the Marais represents contemporary Paris at its most exciting. It is an easy walk from Oberkampf (southeast on the Rue Commines), but if you want to go directly there, take the Metro line 3 to the Opera station, and change here for the 8 train towards Créteil-Préfecture. Exit the train and the station at Filles du Calvaire and walk southeast on the Rue des Filles du Calvaire into the heart of the Marais.

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